My Little Corner of Sherlock

Be patient and tough, someday this pain will be useful to you. ~ Ovid

217,262 notes

buckbarrow:

do you ever have second-hand obsessions

like one of your friends is super obsessed with a thing so whenever you see something about it you’re like “YES THIS THING” but you’re not the one obsessed with it. they are. you know very little about this thing and yet it still excites you because it excites your friend

(via emmagrant01)

Filed under yup

84,299 notes

kammartinez:

Author John Scalzi was on a roll this morning (currently 7:14 AM, 26 Sept. 2014) with a tweet he found from some guy sending out an “ultimatum” to women to “make a choice” between feminism and, well, men like him. So Scalzi launched into a truly magnificent set of scorchers, which I’m posting here for the delectation of people everywhere.

Also: I would like to thank that guy for setting the ultimatum. It makes finding a boyfriend so much easier when the undesirable ones wear a placard identifying themselves.

(via msaether)

1,774 notes

fellow writers and artists who are creating characters who belong to marginalized groups you yourself are not a part of

areyoutryingtodeduceme:

sayahomu:

  • accept that you’re going to fuck up. it’s unavoidable and inevitable, when you’re writing about such a diverse group that you do not have experience as. there’s going to be things you don’t know, thing you overlook. (making mistakes is a part of writing and drawing anyway.)
  • when you do fuck up, and someone points it out, be graceful and grateful. acknowledge your mistake, ask how you can fix it, and then do it.
  • please don’t whine about how hard it is to write [x] characters. if it’s hard for you to write them, imagine how [x] fans feel, growing up with media that for the most part doesn’t have people like them!
  • the key to writing diversity is not to have just one [x] character. it’s to have multiple [x] characters with different personalities and backgrounds and appearances. that’s how you (somewhat) avoid stereotypes and create real people.
  • realize that when writing [x] characters, you do not always have to write about [race, gender, whatever] as a social issue. there’s a lot to be said for power, wish fulfillment, and escapist fantasies - which marginalized groups are often excluded from in mainstream media.
  • if you get a significant amount of attention and fans, amplify the voices of people from [x] group. promote articles and blogs run by [x] people, promote art from [x] people. your voice as someone who is not [x] will be prioritized over that of someone who actually is [x] - so try to make up for that unfairness as much as you can.
  • recognize that you owe a lot to [x] people, particularly fans and critics of your work as well as those who have written about writing or drawing [x] characters. they have insight you often do not, and educating you takes up their time and energy, time and energy which they could have spent doing something else. once again, be grateful.
  • and if you’re not writing or drawing [x] characters… ask yourself why.

This post is the best because honestly I think about this a LOT whenever I sit down to work out a new comic idea. I’m a cis het white female, so I’m pretty privileged in a lot of ways, and I’m constantly having to go back over my characters and be like “does the main character of this story HAVE to be a white girl, or am I just doing that because that’s what I best relate to? How does this story change if the characters race changes? Or gender? Does it have to change the story at all? Can this character be asexual? Will it make any difference in the story or is it just something that’s unquestioned? Why?” and so on. Because I look at media and see that there is a lack of POC in lead roles, or different genders and sexualities being portrayed correctly and while I question “am I the right person to be trying to make a difference in that?” the answer I pretty much always give myself is “why the fuck shouldn’t I try?” because if I fuck it up I know someone will call me out on it, and I’ll be able to fix what I did wrong. So. Yeah. I think about this a lot.

(via type40consultingdetective)

837 notes

captain-johnhwatson:

Just imagine like a year or two into their relationship, John and Sherlock come stumbling in the front door, high on adrenaline and giggling, and John presses Sherlock back into the wall, kissing him breathlessly through their laughter and eventually pulling away and saying “You’re going to marry me,” and Sherlock quirking an eyebrow, all cocky, and saying “Oh really? Who says?” And John just grinning and stepping back some and gesturing to the door, saying “The man at the door” and there’s a knock and Sherlock just stares at him for a second before he opens it and there’s Angelo with a huge grin and a small ring box held out in his hand, and he says “John texted me, said you’d be needing this.”

(via johix)

Filed under omg perfect yes this is how the proposal would go down because a) it's full circle and b) john would be able to surprise sherlock because he wouldn't plan anything more than waiting for a case and texting angelo it'd just happen

193,919 notes

littlebluboxx:

silentauroriamthereal:

nofreedomlove:

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"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Oooh. I reblogged a partial version of this recently but I didn’t know how many more there were! I LOVE these!

OK SO THERE ARE TONS MORE OF THESE OF THE ARTISTS FB PAGE. GUYS THESE ARE AWESOME.image

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LETS APPLAUD CAROL ROSSETTI EVERYONEimage

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LOOK

(via msaether)

Filed under i love these some of them are me some of them are people i know all of them are true

3,799 notes

imfemlocked:

In which John Watson looks like an idiot because he’s completely love-struck.

I love how John’s reactions are totally spontaneous and he doesn’t even notice what he’s doing until Sherlock points it out. And how Sherlock’s in full detecting mode, but part of his mind is paying attention to the way John is reacting to him (of course, because he’s showing off). There are sort of two different scenes going on at the same time: Sherlock ranting furiously about his deductions, and John and Sherlock doing their little weird dance around each other – Sherlock’s voice even changes when he’s addressing John.

What’s even funnier is that neither John nor Sherlock seem to really understand what’s going on (“What is John doing? Why is he doing that? I don’t know, but it’s fine”), and apparently neither does Lestrade, whose expression could easily translate into “What sort of parallel universe have I landed on today? Are these two flirting???”

And while we can’t really see Sherlock’s face because the light falls directly on him (which creates a great aura), in the last gif his mouth twitches upwards. Perhaps the first of his “only for John” smiles?

(via thewholestreet)

Filed under sherlock holmes john watson greg lestrade love it yes good

34 notes

Lost Chances

mylittlecornerofsherlock:

John’s gut sinks as he watches Sherlock’s plane take flight. Regret sits heavy in his belly because he knows that, yet again, he’s missed his chance. He should have listened to that little voice, “Take a chance. You never know, it might be great.”

The author’s extended ending to His Last Vow.

If John is honest with himself about this thing that washes over him whenever he is in Sherlock’s presence, he’d admit he’s had feelings for Sherlock Holmes almost since the beginning. But he’s always pushed it to the back of his mind, reserved for those spare moments he keeps to himself. Now, here, on the tarmac, as he watches Sherlock’s plane ascend, his palm still tingling from their last handshake; John’s emotions come crashing in on him and he know better than to try and convince himself that it was anything other than love and that the sinking feeling in his gut is regret.

And once more for the morning crowd.

Filed under who's going to promote an author's work if they don't do it lost chances fan fic john watson sherlock holmes mary morstan mycroft holmes johnlock